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Sharing learning through blogging

9 August 2013

Blogging can be a great tool for both funders and projects looking to record impact in more creative ways. In this guest post, Marcus Hulme explains how projects reaching out to vulnerable older people in England have been encouraged to digitally document the ups and downs of their projects – learning a raft of digital skills along the way.

When we developed our Silver Dreams programme in England we decided that we wanted to pilot some new approaches to improve our service to customers. This included having an online application form, providing capacity building support to projects and using blogging to report impact.

Marcus Hulme

Marcus Hulme

The Silver Dreams programme has funded 37 pilot projects to test out creative ways to help vulnerable older people deal with transitions in their lives. Projects received funding of up to £200k to test out activities over 12 to 18 months.

Up to five pilot projects will receive a larger grant of up to £1 million each to scale up or replicate their idea. Activities delivered mainly focus on advocacy, peer befriending, skills sharing and older people volunteering to support each other in their communities.

We introduced blogging as a new tool for reporting by projects as we wanted to support them to openly share learning about the difference they were making in communities.

This could help projects to share good practice with one another but also provide rich information for other organisations working with older people so that they can learn about the impact of the novel approaches funded through the programme.

The concept of blogging was new for many of the organisations we funded so we provided specialist training to support them which was positively received. Many projects have embraced the concept of blogging and to date over 550 blog posts have been published, with an average of 15 posts per project. Projects also felt that this new approach led to reduced time filling in forms for funders and increased transparency between organisations to share learning.

For us at the Big Lottery Fund, reporting through blogs has helped us think about how we might open up our data and evaluations so that others can better understand where our funding goes and also help build potential connections between people and projects. The evidence from the blogs is also providing valuable learning to inform our own future policy around ageing.

Using blogs has led to many benefits such as enabling better connections to be developed between projects, providing more opportunities to share best practice, raising the profile of projects with local and national organisations, building networks and developing the skills of staff and volunteers.

The blogs from projects are available here: http://silverdreamsblog.wordpress.com/

Marcus Hulme is Senior Policy and Learning Officer at the Big Lottery Fund

What do you think about this approach to reporting project impact?

Does your project regularly blog about its activities and the people benefiting from the work you do? Leave you comments below or join the conversation on Twitter using #biglf.

10 Comments leave one →
  1. 9 August 2013 12:39 pm

    Reblogged this on The Big Lottery Fund Scotland Blog.

  2. 13 August 2013 1:45 pm

    Our blog was slow to take off, but now we regularly post and really value the opportunity to share news and learning. The unexpected bonus was that the discipline of posting regularly creates time for us all to reflect upon what is working well and what we want to do differently. Also like being able to stay in touch with other Silver Dreams

    • Big Lottery Fund permalink*
      13 August 2013 2:42 pm

      Hi Becky,

      Thanks for reading the blog and contributing your experience. It’s good to hear that blogging has helped you evaluate upon what works well for you and what need to be approached differently.

  3. mariemcw permalink
    21 August 2013 10:46 am

    Our cancer, older people and advocacy Silver Dreams funded project has been using our blog to spread the word about what we’re doing. We’d never used a blog before and are chuffed that we’ve had almost 5000 views since we started and have 147 followers. It has shown us that social media is a force to be reckoned with and very worthwhile.

    • Big Lottery Fund permalink*
      21 August 2013 10:50 am

      Thanks for reading the blog and making a comment. It’s great to hear that you’ve had such good levels of interest in your blog and wider work. Social media is indeed a powerful tool – we’re glad that you’ve embraced it!

  4. 22 August 2013 12:32 pm

    Great to read about this, I know your colleagues will appreciate this and I’m sure your customers will too. This is a great way to share lessons learned, mistakes made, successes etc. Hope you all get a lot of value from the approach, the lovely feedback from mariemcw shows you’re off to a greta start!

    Cheers – Doug

    • Big Lottery Fund permalink*
      23 August 2013 9:23 am

      Hi Doug. Thanks for reading the blog and for taking the time to comment. It’s great to see how enthusiastically Silver Dreams projects have taken on this method of reporting🙂

  5. Sandra permalink
    7 September 2013 8:43 pm

    I love that the Big Lottery has a Senior Policy Officer. I am a Social Worker and a passionate advocate for older people. I currently have a Social Enterprise in planning stage and am really pleased to have come across this entry. Thankyou

Trackbacks

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